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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, it's "meet the press." >>> wall of destruction, the death toll soars from japan's twin disasters as authorities race to head off nuclear meltdowns. >>> shock waves, the situation in japan raises fears over the safety of nuclear power plants here at home. >>> and whiteout, a late winter blizzard leaves hundreds of motorists stranded in north dakota. >>> good morning, those stories and more straight ahead, this is first look on msnbc. >>> and we begin this morning with a country in crisis, in japan this morning, rescuers are searching for signs of life beneath the rubble as the clock ticks in the wake of friday's epic disaster. japanese please say they've recovered another 1,000 bodies that washed ashore along the miyagi coast, rising a mounting death toll that is believed to be above 10,000, nbc's kristen dahlgren joins us from tokyo with more. >> reporter: there have been more than 300 aftershocks registered here there were new warnings today. and now growing concerns over the possibility of a nuclear accident. with heavy equipment, and bare hands, rescue workers continue the des
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
on the mounting nuclear crisis in japan, authorizing the first evacuations of american government employees out of the country. in addition, the state department is warning all u.s. citizens to consider leaving japan. the unpredictable weather conditions risks spreading radioactive material. that move comes as japanese crews and military helicopters brave radiation to dump sea water on to the stricken fukushima complex. the tactics are an attempt to cool overheated radium fuel that may be on the verge of spewing out more radiation. meanwhile, plant operators say they're racing to finish a new power line that could restore cooling systems and ease the crisis. still, the top u.s. nuclear regulatory official is warning american citizens within 50 miles of the complex to leave the area or at least remain indoors. testifying on capitol hill yesterday that the situation is "very serious." >> we believe that there is no water in the spent fuel pool known as number four. i would say that it is my great hope that the information that we have is not accurate. i would hope for the sake of everyone that th
>>> good morning. breaking news. japan's nuclear crisis takes a dire turn. high levels of radiation spewing from the damaged nuclear plant following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. an official is calling it, quote, a very bad scerio as officials work to contain the risk today, tuesday, march 15, officials work to contain the risk today, tuesday, march 15, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> officials in japan are saying the radiation leaking from the crippled nuclear power plant is enough to impact human health. >> the big concern is the number 2 reactor which exploded on monday sending more radiation into the air and then a fire at reactor 4 broke out. that one had been shut down for maintenance before the quake. all but 50 employees of the plant have been evacuated. in a nationally televised address japan's prime minister urged anyone living near the plant who had not already evacuated to seal themselves indoors and warned of the very high risk of more leaks. >> you hear
it for us today. i'm dylan ratigan. "hardball with chris matthews" starts right now. >>> escape from japan. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm christ matthews in washington. happy st. patrick's day. leading off tonight, high anxiety. here's how desperate it's gotten at that nuclear plant over in japan. authorities have been reduced to dumping water from helicopters and spraying water from fire trucks in a last-ditch effort to cool those spent fuel rods. in a moment, we'll hear from a nuclear power regulatory commissioner and get a report from the ground in japan. >>> also, credibility gap. the widening chasm between what the japanese government is saying and what we can believe. it happened at three mile island. it really happened at chernobyl and now it's happening at japan, officials playing down the dangers. we'll try to bridge the credibility gap tonight. >>> plus, the nuclear disaster has once again turned u.s. public opinion, obviously, against nuclear power. could have predicted that. but that hasn't stopped die-hard supporters from calling this a once-in-a-lifetime fluke
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
and panic spreading as high levels of radiation move south. this is japan's emperrer who makes a rare appearance on tv to mourn the losses and praise the relief efforts and the list of the dead and missing is growing. now topping 11,000. "early" this wednesday morning, march 16th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning. you are looking at pictures of what so much of the world is focused on this morning. and that is that nuclear plant in fukushima as we monitor the situation which is, i mean, fluid is probably putting it mildly, chris. >> yeah. every hour a new development there as the people at fukushima at this nuclear reactor are doing all they can to contain a full-scale nuclear emergency now. they are now called the faceless 50. the 50 employees or so basically evacuated and moved back in and the last 50 there to avert a massive nuclear sdadisaster and wonder if they are paying for their lives and what is the situation like. >> how much longer can they stay in that role. they were evacuated and went back. the latest on the situation. >>> another fire is burning at the
of radiation move south. this as japan's emperor makes a rare appearance on tv to mourn the losses and praise the relief efforts. and the list of the dead and missing is growing, now topping 11,000, "early" this wednesday missing is growing, now topping 11,000, "early" this wednesday morning, march 16th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning. you are looking at pictures of what so much of the world is focused on this morning. and that is that nuclear plant in fukushima, as we monitor the situation, which is fluid, is probably putting it mildly. >> every hour there's a new development there, as the people at fukushima, at this nuclear reactor, are doing all they can to contain a full-scale nuclear emergency right now. we keep hearing the stories of now being called the faceless 50. 50 employees or so that are basically evacuated and moved back in. the last 50 that are really there to avert a massive nuclear disaster. now we wonder if these poor people are really kind of paying with their lives. what is the situation like. >> and looking at the last line of defense and how much lo
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
rock in new york city. japan is working to contain a humanitarian nuclear and economic crisis. three days after getting hit by a devastating earthquake and tsunami. the pictures still so dramatic. right now, rescue workers are searching for survivors. largely in the country's coastal towns. where this morning, police say the death toll is mounting. in all, more than 10,000 people are estimated dead. millions of residents are still without power, and clean drinking water. the japanese coast is also been struck by more than 100 aftershocks. 150 aftershocks since friday alone. the latest one, a 6.2-magnitude quake followed by a new tsunami scare. only a scare today. safety concerns are lingering over growing problems at nuclear facility. earlier today, 11 people were hurt when a second hydrogen explosion rocked a nuclear plant that sent a column of smoke into the air. that blast was felt 25 miles away. but the plant's operator says radiation levels are fortunately still within the legal limits. >>> meanwhile, the u.s. now says it's moved its ships and aircraft away from one of the quake
in japan, talking directly about the nuclear crisis for the first time. the president offering help and reassuring folks in the u.s. that they are safe. >> we are bringing all available resources to bear to closely monitor the situation and to protect american citizens who may be in harm's way. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. >> his comments coming amid raids of rising doubts about japan's ability to control this reactor and a potential full-on meltdown. the attempt to cool down the reactors by spreading them with water dropped out of helicopters apparently having little to no impact. restoring power to the plant not happening until tomorrow at the earliest, which would resurrect the water cooling systems. radiation levels at 300 feet above the plant measured today at nearly 9 r.e.m. by comparison, a chest c.t. scan has just about 0.7 r.e.m. you have to get up to 50 to 75 r.e.m. to get immediate symptoms like hair loss as a result of exposure. so, a lot of exposu
>>> good morning. breaking news. a surge in radiation levels at the crippled nuclear plant in japan forces emergency crews to evacuate overnight. while they are now getting back to work, there are new fears that those 50 heroic workers could be running out of options today, wednesday, march 16, 2011. r captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. meredith is on assignment. you just think about the pressure those workers must be under, the sacrifice they may be making. they are being dubbed the fukushima 50, one of the last lines of defense against an all-out meltdown. >> imagine the concern when they were temporarily pulled from the plant overnight after radiation levels spiked for a short term. another concern, the second fire reactor number four today, where spent fuel rods are being stored. >> in a rare appearance, japan's emperor delivered a televised address saying he was, quote, deeply worried, but urged people not to give up hope. we are going to have
're goin to oo mend right now we're kind of one to one. japan is two times the amount of debt compared to how much they make every year. is that how far we can go? >> i don't think we're going to get anywhere near that. and one way of thinking about this is, in terms of a company's balance sheet, on one side you have what you owe. the other side are your assets. if you were a company and you had a lot of good projects, okay, investments 20%, 30%, i'll lend you money at close to zero interest rate, you would be foolish not to do it. because it's exactly by investing that you're going to grow and become a big company. noup there's another point that i try to raise, in the article that i wrote, which is there are lots of ways we can get. we spend literally billions and billions on weapons that don't work. >> and their suggestion is that we should cut some of those back? >> and those don't improve the balance sheet. they create a liability. but they don't create an asset. we can have more security with less spending. >> all righty. of course there's the factors of political will behind all
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)